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Appendix 16

Memoria (report) on construction of the railway to Lago Buenos Aires and junction with the San Antonio to Lago Nahuel Huapí line (first part)

General state of the works at 31 December 1912

A copy of the original text is available in Spanish - click here to go to it.

Glossary of words used in specific ways:
Memoria – Formal progress report.
Patagonico – The type of chassis-less bogie water carrier produced by Nesseldorfer for use in Patagonia.
Plataforma – A bogie flat wagon generally provided with pockets along the side of the sole-bars and buffer beams to allow the fitting of temporary sides (sometimes referred to as barranda) needed for some traffic, eg their seasonal conversion into open sheep wagons.
Resident Engineer is used in this report for the Argentine term Ingeniero Director or simply Director, as meaning the person in overall charge of the Works at Puerto Deseado.
Superiority – A literal translation of the Argentine term, used in the context of this report, as referring to the person, and the department of, the Inspector General de Construcciones of the Ferrocarriles del Estado based in Buenos Aires.
Tapada – Spanish English dictionaries do not show a translation for this word in relation to railway use. A study of the definitions given by the Real Academia Española, and the contexts in which it is used, suggests that it could well mean the English term boxing, used in connection with permanent way works – that is the placing of loosely consolidated ballast above the level of the well consolidated ballast supporting the sleepers, between and at the ends of the sleepers, and in Argentine practice, covering the top surface of the sleeper by about a couple of inches to provide protection against fire. Half tapada thus means placing the first part of this material in a two stage process for carrying out this work.
Works – Used as a translation of the Argentine word Construcción to mean the whole project, including completing the the detailed design and setting out of the line, its construction including much of the procurement of materials and labour, and its operation while the railhead is being advanced.

14 March 1913
Inspector General of Construction
Ingeniero Ariodante Giovacchini
Buenos Aires

In response to Telegram N°4 from the Inspector General's Department, I have the pleasure of attaching the Memoria de los trabajos de ésta construcción [Memoria of the Tasks Carried out in this Project] up to 31 December 1912.
Yours attentively
Resident Engineer

REPORT OF THE WORKS AS AT 1 JANUARY 1913

IMPORTANT NOTE – At the start of 1912 the Superiority was disposed to reduce the monthly allocation of funds for these Works and, as a consequence, instructed that the work force be reduced, and the earthworks be stopped at Km. 262.000. In view of this, a plan was drawn up for the work to be carried out within the newly established resources, and the construction of the Works have been continued in accordance with it. The manual work force has been reduced in half, from 950 at the end of last year to 468 at the end of this year. The technical staff, which previously comprised Resident Engineer, seven engineers and two assistant engineers was reduced to Resident Engineer, four engineers and one assistant engineer.

ORGANISATION OF THE WORKS

As with other work undertaken by the State, it comprises the following sections:
1 – Management
2 – Supervision and Design
3 - Ways
4 – Works
5 – Earthworks
6 – Accounts
7 – Stores
8 – Workshops and Traction
9 – Movement

In accordance with the economy plan introduced the Ways, Works and Earthworks sections have been combined into one with an engineer, first class in charge, with one second class, and one third class, engineers as assistants.

All the sections have operated strictly in accordance with the rules applicable to each of them.

END OF PAGE 1

DISTRIBUTION OF STAFF AND THEIR DUTIES – WORK CARRIED OUT
a) – SUPERVISION AND DESIGN SECTION
An engineer, second class, an assistant engineer, a calculator, two inspectors-of-works.
Design – During the year 25 assorted designs, 33 smaller drawings, and innumerable detail sketches, have been prepared according to the needs of the various sections.
As-built drawings – This collection will be needed for the working of the railway, and for the final report. To date some 69 cloth drawings of uniform size have been prepared, of which 41 were prepared in the last year.
Tracers – The tracers have prepared 98 drawings on cloth, which brings the number of drawings archived to 228 designs and 69 as-built drawings.
Blueprinting – All the copies required by the various sections have been supplied.
Agreements and Contracts – During the year 33 piece-work agreements and two contracts have been completed:

Unloading ships' cargoes, and loading same on to wagons

6 agreements

Buildings

5 "

Installing rails

3 "

Levelling and tapada

5 "

Telegraph line

2 "

Provision of water to staff, and to the public

3 "

Miscellaneous jobs

9 "

33 agreements

The two contracts are for the supply of basic necessities for the staff on the Works.

Expenditure – During the year the following amounts have been checked and disbursed:

Month

By wages

By certificates

January

$ 34,827.02

$ 24,579.69

February

" 34,566.20

" 40,091.75

March

" 33,536.00

" 19,717.94

April

" 35,358.01

" 16,162.52

May

" 33,279.46

" 20,523.69

June

" 32,996.04

" 14,370.49

July

" 30,352.38

" 19,984.06

August

" 31,861.50

" 22,746.26

Carry forward

267176.61

178176.40

END OF PAGE 2

Brought forward

$267,176.61

$178,176.40

September

" 33,063.46

" 19,602.06

October

" 31,871.37

" 19,273.76

November

" 33,284.50

" 13,041.23

December

" 32,507.62

" 20,580.52

Total

$397,903.76

$250,673.97

Grand total
$ m/n. 648,577.73 c/l

b) – WAYS WORKS AND EARTHWORKS SECTION
One engineer, first class, one engineer, second class, one engineer, third class and four inspectors-of-works.
Direct labour
1 General squad (various duties) 13 men
5 Track maintenance squads 56 "
4 Works and ancillary squads 100 "
1 Troop (embankments) 4 "
Total 173 men
The Railing and Ballasting piece-work gangs end the year with 160 men. The works carried out during the year were:
Railing and Ballasting
a) Main line Km. 59.597,00
b) Secondary lines " 5.358,00
c) Turn-outs placed N° 24
d) Level crossings formed " 9
e) Signals placed " 7
f) Levelling and tapada completed Km. 74.000,00
g) Cattle grids formed N° 19
Works and Ancilliary Items
a) Engineering works -
Pipe culverts, 0.60 m. diameter N° 8
Pipe culverts, 0.30 m. diámeter " 13
b) Buildings constructed
For passengers N° 3 at Km. 95, 142 and 162.
For goods " 2 " " 61 and 162.
For surfacemen " 2 " " 21 and 202.
Engine ash pit " 1 " " 202.
c) Buildings under construction at 31 December 1912
For passengers 4 at Km. 0.000, 182, 202 and 224.
For goods 1 " " 202.
For surfacemen 2 " " 121 and 251.
For engine shed 1 at Km. 0.000.
Turntable 2 at Km. 0.000 and 202.
Engine ash pit 1 " " 0.000.

END OF PAGE 3

d) Water services completed -
At Km. 61, 95, 121 and 142 Total 4.
e) Water services under construction -
At Km. 80, 152, 182, 202 and 224 Total 5.
f) Telegraph -
Length constructed – 52.000,00 km..
g) Fencing -
Length constructed – 8.200,00 km..

c) ACCOUNTS
Staff – Head, Bookkeeper, Treasurer, Cashier and Accountancy Assistant.
Works carried out – All the relevant duties have been carried out in accordance with the rules. In the section Marcha económica de las obras [Economic progress of the Works] the movement of funds may be seen.

d) STORES
Staff – Head, Bookkeeper, Accountancy Assistant.
This section has under its control the central store and yard for materials, also the receipt of the materials brought by steamer and the adzing and drilling of sleepers.-
For this there is a squad of twelve labourers and two foremen, one of which acts as dispatcher, and the other is in charge of the yard.
The work includes unloading the ships, loading materials on to wagons, adzing and drilling sleepers, distribution of water to staff, which is done by piece-work gangs with their own staff.
There are five stores; the central at Km. 0.000 station, where the offices are located, and where all the small materials are catalogued. This store has ample shelving to provide good service, and has a despatch counter and a concrete floor, all of which guarantees good order and the avoidance of losses.

END OF PAGE 4

The second store is stone-built, cemented with clay, for use for the storage of flammable materials, and is located in a gully to limit the damage in the event of fire.
The third store is timber framed, and clad in galvanised [corrugated] sheets as is the first. It is used for storing Portland cement and ironmongery, taking advantage of any spare space for other materials.
The fourth store was made of scrap materials in order to protect the timber required for the Works from the weather.
The fifth is located in the Port, and is used for the storage of Portland cement.

e) – TRACTION AND WORKSHOPS
Staff – Head, charge hand (note taker)
It is divided into three sections : Mechanical, Carpentry and Traction.
The Mechanical Section is headed by a Foreman Mechanic with, at the end of the year, 42 men under his direction, split between operations and erection.
The principal works carried out during the year are the following:
a) – Assembly of the following new stock:
4 Pacific type Locomotives
21 Nesseldorfer plataformas of 40,000 kgs. capacity
4 Patagonico tank wagons
1 Harland and Hollingsworth first class coach
2 " " " second class coaches
2 " " " composite coaches
1 " " " postal van
b) – Repairs to the following stock:
8 engines – started repairs; one still under repair
301 repairs to goods vehicles
2 second hand coaches overhauled
c) – Miscellaneous jobs
1 - Building the permanent engine shed at Km. 0.000 station.
2 - Providing and fitting ironmongery for all the buildings built, and installation of water services throughout the year.
3 - Provision of tools and implements, brackets for telegraph poles, parts for signals, horse shoes, etc.

Carpentry
The Carpentry Section is headed by a Foreman Carpenter with,

END OF PAGE 5

at the end of the year, 27 men under his direction, split between carpentry and erection.
The main jobs carried out during the year were the following:
Rolling stock: Assembly of one first class coach, two second class coaches, two composite coaches and a postal van.
Assembly of 26 goods vehicles; the rebuilding of a plataforma of 40,000 kg. capacity to a sheep van.
Buildings: All of the carpentry and joinery for the passenger building at Km. 0.000 station. The carpentry for the first class building at Km. 202.028 station, one for the second class building at Km. 162.528 station and for the third class building at Km. 182 station.- The same for a goods shed at Km. 162 station; the same for two surfacemen's cottages at Km. 21 and 202 stations.
Various: Fence and incidentals at Km.0.000 station – field gates and wicket gates in fences – the repair of (horse) carts, coaches, staff implements and the pattern-making for the foundry, etc.

Traction
The traction section is headed by an Engine Inspector with the following staff under his direction:
4 Engine Drivers
6 Firemen
2 Crane drivers
6 Engine Cleaners
5 Pumpmen
1 Labourer
2 Greasers
The pumpmen are involved with the water supply along the line for the engines. The engine drivers and firemen are split between ballast trains and the mixed trains for passengers and materials, and for shunting.
The staff have diligently carried out all the work with which they were involved.

f) MOVEMENT
Staff - At 31 December 1912 there were the following Head (calculator), Assistant (inspector) 5 telegraphists, 6 telephonists, 3 train guards and three pointsmen.
The telegraphists and the telephonists act as station masters along the line. Km. 0.000 station is

END OF PAGE 6

permanently manned by day and night to deal with emergencies. The guards and pointsmen are distributed among the ballast trains and the mixed materials trains. For more detail see the chapter Explotación condicional [Conditional Working] of this Memoria.

GENERAL PROGRESS
WAYS

RAILLING
On account of the reduction in funds for these Works imposed by the Superiority, it was stipulated in 1912 that the line should be railed to Km. 262.000 (original kilometrage), which was the point at which the earthworks had been stopped. As at this time, the rail head was at Km. 202, it meant that these works should continue without haste, as it had to be limited to a half monthly advance of 5 km., which was formerly the weekly rate. During the four months from April to August inclusive, the railing was stopped due to a lack of sleepers, which meant that the average advance for the remaining eight months was 7.449 km. each half month.
Up to Km. 246.183, Argentino rail, in 12 metre lengths, and 31 kg. per metre has been used. From there, 37 kg. per metre rail, from the construction of the FC del Este has been used.
Secondary lines [passing loops] have been laid during the year at Km. 202.028, 224.404 and 251.128 stations, using 1 in 10 (tangential measure) turnouts and type 2 rails (second hand rail 7.72 metres long).
The railing work has all been undertaken by piece-work, with unit prices of $450.00 y $ 445.00 per kilometre.

LEVELLING AND TAPADA
During the year two piece-work gangs have been employed; one on the first lift of the line and the second on the second and third lifts, together with half tapada.
The material used for the first lift has been tierra negra taken from alongside the line at the points

END OF PAGE 7

where its quality has been suitable. Where poor material has been found, the track has not been lifted by 8 cm, and will be lifted later with material brought by máquina de caballero [it has not been possible to work out what sort of plant this is] on long-term hire and from the quarry opened at Km. 225.000, taking advantage of material which will not be suitable for the second lifting, and which, in other circumstances, would have been deposited in waste tips, occasioning a waste of money.
Before the carrying out the second lift, a suitable lapse of time is necessary to allow consolidation of the first one. Similarly, the second as well as the third lift and the half tapada has been carried out with the same demanding spirit as in previous years, having given particular attention to the quality of the ballast, which is everywhere excellent, and to the careful execution of the work.
With the quarry open at Km. 130.000, the half tapada to Km. 150.000 was completed, but as the costs of transporting the material with machines started to become excessive, a new quarry was sought at Km. 159.000, which allowed the work to be continued to Km. 192.000, as the trial holes at Km. 188.000, 190.000, 195.000, 200.000, 205.000, 209.000 and 210.000 had not given good results. Recently, at Km. 225.000, good ballast was found by good luck, with which the work of the second lift forwards from Km. 192.000 will be started.
As has been said, all the levelling works of the line have been carried out by piece-work at the following unit rates:

First lift of up to 10 cm. (without the provision of ballast) per kilometre.

$ 230,00

For each extra 1 cm per lineal metre.

" 0,02

Ballast, per cubic metre.

" 0,65

Second lift, including the provision of ballast, and its transport at various prices according to distance between $230,00 and $255,00 per kilometre.

Third lift and half tapada, the same between $660.00 and $710.00 per kilometre.

The piece-work gangs have had to fight against a shortage of hands, as during the year consignments of labourers have not been brought south, and the surplus labour resulting from the reduction of the Works has left the area.

MAINTENANCE OF THE LINE
Of the five

END OF PAGE 8

permanent squad allocated to this work, one serves the branch to the Port, the secondary lines at Km. 0.000 station, and the main line as far as Km. 8.000. The other four are spread along the line, looking after about 35.000 kilometres each. The greatest maintenance work has been on the section between the Port and Km. 32.000 where, as is known, the highest embankments are located, as are all the culverts. All these big embankments are not as high or as wide as they should be, due not only to having subsided, but also because the strong winds of the past year have eroded their faces. To overcome this deficiency, and to prevent its recurrence, these embankments have been reinforced with good ballast from the Port as far as Km. 12.000, and with ballast from Km. 19.000 and Km 29.000 for the length from Km.12.000 to Km. 32.000.
In January 1912, before undertaking the strengthening noted, a heavy rain caused water to enter over the west side of the culvert, built over the cañadon Veneciano, in such quantities that it flowed out of the drainage orifices in torrents, washing away fine earth, and thus forming hollows, leaving the track hanging in the air at Km. 4.936. At this point the embankment was made-up using material taken from the widening of the cutting at Km. 5.8000, which had experienced numerous earth falls. To avoid a repeat of the previous year in the Veneciano, a system of ditches to impede the access of the water arising from rainfall was made.
In connection with the metallic components, the area which has given rise to the biggest expense is the same occasioned by its ballast, that is to say the section between the Port and Km. 35.266. This section was railed with rails from the FC CA with associated fish-plates, but in general the bolts are those for FC Sud fish-plates, which do not go well with them, as they spin round when trying to tighten them, making it impossible to adjust them, even though they have been fitted with washers. Bolts matching the fish-plates have been requested,

END OF PAGE 9

as have spring washers which give better results.
Another of the causes of the imperfections noted in this area is the spacing of the sleepers at 0.90 metre centres, which is a little bit too much for the type of rail used, as it makes the ballast work hard.
Despite these imperfections, which are capable of being rectified, the line is in perfect condition, and the expenses involved in its maintenance are minimal.

TELEGRAPH

Work has continued on erecting the two-wire telegraph line, and installing the telegraph apparatus. The end of the telegraph has been stopped at Km. 254.000, a little bit short of the rail-head. The piece-work gang has temporarily been undertaking other work.
This work has been carried out by a piece-work gang at $ 55.00 per kilometre.
As it is not always possible to deploy telegraphists, and because they command a higher wage, telephones have also been installed at all the stations, and works encampments of the piece-work gangs working on the levelling, to assist in the conveying orders and news. To this effect, a combined system is being tried at present, which uses one of the two wires for telephone and telegraph, and allows one of the two wires to be used for the telegraph at the same time as the telephone is being used.

WORKS

BUILDINGS

The most important work, which may be considered as almost complete, is the passenger building at Km. 0.000 station. It was started at the beginning of 1912 [sic] and if its construction has taken somewhat more than two years; this has been due principally to the reduction in staff made in 1912. In general, its layout is as defined by the design sent by the Superiority, but with some altered details. The most important of these was the construction of the roof using concrete reinforced by Hy-rib metal, in place of galvanised iron sheets which would have been

END OF PAGE 10

detrimental to the architectural style of the work.
This roof has been finished with a layer of waterproof Ceresita which was then painted in two shades of Truscon special paint.
The windows are made of cedar, and the doors of cedar and spruce, which was obtained in Buenos Aires, as were the joinery fittings, which are of nickel-plated brass.
The main staircase is of cedar, and that to the attic of red pine, as is the rest of the joinery of the building. All the joinery has been carried out by workmen of the Works.
At present, although there are some details to complete, the building is serving as offices for the Works and for public traffic.

Ceresita – Ceresita is, and presumably was, a Chilean firm making all sorts of paints, waterproofing materials and surface coatings. Presumably here it was a film of material to waterproof the underlying concrete.
Truscon – Truscon was a firm in the USA of builders merchants. One of their lines was a rubber-based waterproof decorative paint finish.

This building, and all the other masonry works carried out during the year, have been built with stone quarried from the quarry at the Port, which has given no cause for complaint.
All the construction details, whether the proportions of the mixes, assembling roofs, laying wooden floors, the thicknesses of joints, mixes for plasterwork, painting, assembling units, etc has been carried out in accordance with the the specification issued by the Superiority.
The engine shed, whose construction was started during the year just finished, is almost complete; at the present time the pit for the ashes, the drains and the floors are being carried out. Part of it was assembled from the sheds used in the Exposición del Centenario, and are thus steel framed with an external covering of corrugated galvanised sheeting. The area covered has six lines 45 metres long, which have a capacity sufficient for twelve tender engines, which will be enough, taking in to account the small shed which will be built at Km. 202.128 station.
The ash pit which is presently being constructed has a special arrangement to allow the removal of an engine's axle if necessary.

Exposición del Centenario – As part of the celebrations of the centenary of the independence of what was to become Argentina, there was a massive exhibition in Buenos Aires of railway equipment, much of it British.

Permanent workshops
A start will be made to this important accessory of the line

END OF PAGE 11

during the year into which we are entering. Next to the engine shed, and with the same materials from the same source, is a workshop which will have to be fully equipped, due to the isolated situation in which we find ourselves. This railway, unlike others, does not have the advantage of being linked to engineering centres to which stock can be sent, at little expense and loss of time, when repairs are needed. Here such an arrangement cannot be contemplated, thus requiring the provision of complete workshops, capable of undertaking any repair. In consequence, to the existing machinery in the temporary workshops, which are already well equipped, other complementary machines will be added, principally a twenty-tonne crane for dismantling locomotives, another of three for lesser loads, an 80 hp motor, and an iron foundry of 2,000 kg capacity.
Coach shed – At Km. 0.000 station, the temporary engine shed, built at the start of the Works, will shortly be enlarged. Its framing is of red pine, clad in corrugated galvanised sheet. The covered area is occupied by two lines each 68 metres long, which is enough to accommodate the six new Harlan and Hollingsworth coaches now on the line.

WATER SUPPLY TO THE STATIONS
This is an aspect which has been given priority as it is necessary to examine each location carefully over a period of time, in order to avoid unpleasant surprises in the future, which have occurred in more than one case. Expensive works, have been hurriedly carried out on some wells, which although good at first, turned out to be bad, through lack of flow or of water quality.
As is natural, the study started at each station with a bore-hole, which was taken down only as far as the first water table. It has not been necessary, other than at Km. 0.000 station, to look for the second one.

END OF PAGE 12

Once the water table had been found the analysis and estimation of the approximate flow of the water was carried out. When these determinations were known, a temporary supply facility was installed, which was used to supply the needs of the railing and track lifting gangs, and allows the consistency of the supply and quality to be confirmed over a period of time. Only once these have been confirmed, with the analysis undertaken in a chemical laboratory in Buenos Aires, have the permanent water supply facilities been installed, or are being installed.
In some cases the boring has proved expensive, because the ground proved to be loose gravel mixed with sand, which fell in at each pass. There was no other remedy than to provide lining immediately.
At the start of 1912, the progress on the trial bores was as follows, advancing from Km. 121.000:
At Km. 141.000, a well 8,70 metres deep gave no more than 4,200 litres per day.
At Km. 161.000, a well 26 metres deep gave no more than 4,000 litres per day.
At Km. 182.628, the existing bore gave only enough water for the supply of the station building itself.
At Km. 202.028 station, a well had been started the previous year, which had to be lined in masonry as it was sunk. This effort was carried out as the ground conditions appeared to indicate the presence of water, but it was sterile. At 16 metres the diameter of the excavation was reduced, and the lining of the well was continued with sheets of galvanised iron down to 30 metres where, unfortunately, very salt water was found. The situation was then difficult, as trains had to make runs of 80 kilometres without water being available. To deal with this it was necessary to attach tank wagons for water at Km. 121.000 station.

END OF PAGE 13

However this did not resolve the situation, and a trial hole was dug in a low point at Km. 208.000, finding there water at a depth of 2 metres.
At this point nothing was installed, as there was a high embankment there, and it was advisable to search in another location, nearer to the station.
Then an excavation was made 1,000 metres to the north west of Km. 202.028 station, finding water at a depth of 5.20 metres, and a quantity amounting to
about 150,000 litres per day.
Despite the length of the pipework laid, the problem was resolved because the point where the bore was located, was only a metre different from the level of the rail, nevertheless it was better to await the arrival of a small boring machine from Buenos Aires, or in the mean time start new excavations at Km. 182.628 station.
Here the excavation started 35 metres to the east of the centre line of the station, always encountering difficulties caused by the sides´falling in, which required the work to be progressed as at Km. 202.000, forming a masonry lining as it was excavated. At 8.35 metres, sweet water was found, but for greater security the excavation was continued down to 11.35 metres. In order to do this, work had to be carried out by day and night; it was difficult to lower the water level despite the use of a steam pump, a petrol-driven pump and a hand pump. The workers, too, worked wet through in very low temperatures. This well, of more than 250,000 litres daily, is of good quality and has been submitted for approval to the Superiority. Nevertheless, as a result of the precautions mentioned, a start has not been made to that permanent service, as with more time observing the well may show it drawing water of inferior quality.
At Km. 202.288 station various bores were made finally finding water at Km. 208.000, at 28 metres from the centre of the line, which is

END OF PAGE 14

intended to provide the permanent supply. Other wells made at the same station were not used due to their poor locations, with the exception of one located near the loading platform for livestock, to which it is thought should be added a wind mill to allow its use for washing and for drinking water for livestock.
In Km. 224.404 station, water has been found at 9 metres with a rate of flow of 1,200 litres per hour at the start, but now is only 500 litres. The well is lined in masonry.
In Km. 251.128, there is a well 6.4 metres deep which gives 3,000 litres per hour.
Other excavations have been made at Km. 283.000 to 4.3 metres deep and gives 16,000 litres per day; at Km. 302.900, not yet completed; at Km. 322.500, where water has been found at 7.70 metres down with a flow of about 16,000 litres per day, which may vary later on.
With everything that has been said, it is easy to understand that it is impossible to standardise on the locations of the wells and the supply pipes.
At the start of the Works, water tanks to supply the engines were standardised on the rectangular steel Piggott patent tank. In addition to being of high quality, they have the advantage of being able to have their capacity added to, or reduced, according to the needs of the supply, and the output of the well.
The installation of these will stop at Km. 182.628 station, and starting at Km. 202.028 station, the tanks will be Parcus circular tanks of 45,000 litres capacity, not alterable, which have been send by the Superiority. For Km. 224.028 a Piggott tank of one row of panels deep, that is of 16,000 litres capacity, has been obtained, as the output from the well makes the use of a Parcus tank unnecessary, as it would be excessively big.

Piggott – Thomas Piggott & Co of Birmingham was a firm in the late 19th and early 20th centuries who specialised in pressed steel products such as gasometers, boilers, water storage tanks etc. The water storage tanks were a patented modular concept, made of square pressed steel panels bolted together through a lip round each edge.

A swivelling arm to take the discharge point over the centre line of the track has been added to the tanks already built in order to make taking on water easier. On the tanks being built, this will be included in their construction.

Parcus would appear to be another form of steel tank delivered in knock-down form. It was circular, and could only be assembled to provide 45,000 litres capacity.

END OF PAGE 15

Before finishing this paragraph, a matter of great importance needs to be mentioned, not only for economy in future expenditure, but for public. It is necessary to proceed to a complete investigation at Km. 0.000 station to resolve the problem of the provision of potable water, which would avoid the population and the railway from the need to transport it by train. Leaving aside the cost of the present way of providing water from stations along the line, it is necessary nevertheless, to consider the time when the increase in the population, the expansion of the Port and development of railway traffic, will exceed the water supply which the trains can carry, and the wells can supply. To this end it is wise to make the effort to find a solution, be it by means of deep wells, or by means of pipes from one of the springs in the neighbourhood, and resolve the problem.

ACCESSORIES IN THE STATIONS
Turntables

In the course of the year, three turntables have been received, one of which has been almost completely installed at Km. 0.000 station. The installation of another has been started at Km. 202.026 station. The last will be located at Km. 95.101 station, thus equipping the three sections of the line approved as far as about Km. 320.000. Nevertheless, it is necessary to take into account the station intended to be located at about Km. 322.500, which will require a fourth turntable, whether it is an intermediate or a terminal station.
The turntables have a block of semi-reinforced concrete for the central pivot, floors of concrete, and circular walls of hydraulic masonry.

Wagon Weighing Machines

One has been received complete with integral rails, with a maximum capacity of 70,000 kilos. The installation has been started at Km. 0.000 station in front of the passenger building. Its base will also be of masonry. Its assembly was not started sooner

END OF PAGE 16

as some of the parts had not yet arrived.

Enclosures and Fences

As is known, the estimate for this line did not propose fences alongside the line, except in the camp [countryside] between Km. 143.293 and Km. 159.436, which have been completed. Cattle grids have been provided at each end. Considering it necessary, and having sufficient materials to hand, it is proposed to fence the secondary lines to the Port.
The proposed fencing for the stations up to the railhead have all been completed, with the exception of Km. 224.404 station, whose fencing will be used for the secondary lines to the Port.
All the fencing has been carried out in accordance with the standard drawings. Turnstiles for pedestrians, adjacent to the vehicular gates, to allow them to be closed at convenient times have been added by the Design Section.
At Km. 0.000 station, because of its closeness to the village, and for its numerous facilities and stores containing valuable materials, whose security it is prudent to ensure, a system of enclosures is proposed, which will be provided opportunely.

Engineering Works

As is noted in the chapter Avance de los trabajos [Advance of the Works], the construction of pipe culverts, of reinforced concrete 0.60 and 0.30 metres diameter, has continued throughout the year, according to the needs of the topography. All the open and arched culverts proposed in the original design have been eliminated. This has resulted in a notable economy, which, naturally, is not exaggerated, since the pipes are made in sufficient quantities soas to always meet the demand.

Locomotives

As seen in the Estado General [General State], the Works has 14 engines, of which, it should be borne in mind, only 6 are new, the rest are engines used by other railways, and are solely for the construction of the line.

END OF PAGE 17

The six new engines, of a type called Pacific, have the following data:
Weight of engine only, empty tonnes 50.000
Weight of tender, empty " 20.000
Weight of engine in running order " 55.000
Weight of tender in running order " 45.000
Weight carried by bogie " 16.000
Adhesive weight " 39.000
Heating area of boiler m2 195.000
Grate area " 2.800
Capacity of tender: water tonnes 18.000
Capacity of tender: coal " 7.000
Four of these engines were built in 1910 by Haine-Saint Pierre, Belgium, and the other two in the same year by Cockerill Seraing, Belgium. All were erected and adjusted in the workshops of these Works by the Works' own personnel.
The second-hand engines are the following:
Tender engines
1 – Built by Neilson & Co. of Glasgow in 1889, from the F.C.C.A., has 23 years of service.
1 – Built by the same in 1890, from the same railway, has 22 years of service.
1 – Built by Sharp Stewart & Co. of Manchester in 1885, from the F.C.S., has 27 years of service.2 – Built by The Baldwin Locomotive of Philadelphia, date of construction not known, from the F.C.A..
1 – Built by Beyer Peacock from the F.C.C.A
Tank engines
1 – Built by The Baldwin Locomotive of Philadelphia, from the F.C.A..
1 – Built by Manning Wardle from the F.C.S..

Coaches

The new stock comprises one first class coach, two second class coaches, two composite coaches and one postal van, all were built by Harlan and

END OF PAGE 18

Hollingworth and have been assembled by personnel of the Works. They are fitted with modern conveniences such as electric lighting and heating.

Goods vehicles

All the new stock comes from Nesseldorfer, and like the rest, has been assembled by personnel of the Works. There are only two types, vans and plataformas.
As the line has still to be provided with wagons for the conveyance of livestock, as provided for in the estimate, and as it was urgent that the needs of the populace were met, a rebuilding of one of the new plataformas to make a livestock wagon was designed and carried out here. These rebuildings will be continued until 6 are converted. Having prepared 7 temporary open wagons for livestock transport, this will suffice until the arrival of the 14 wagons which the Superiority has been asked for.
The Patagonico tank wagons provided undertake an important service, principally that of the cartage of drinking water from Km. 41.000 and Km. 61.000 stations to Puerto Deseado. They supply not only the Works, but also the public supply which is dependant on this service.

FINANCIAL MOVEMENT OF THE WORKS
Movement of funds

a) Income

In the course of 1912 the Works has received the following sums:

From the General Treasury of the Nation

$ m/n. 648,000.00

Collected from transport charged to the public account

" " 32,786.84

Charged for the sale of material

" " 11,534.33

Charged for the recharge of carriage and expenses on the above materials

" " 2,511.61

Charged for the sale of water

" " 920.35

Charged for lost tools

" " 253.11

Miscellaneous charges

" " 3,266.00

Total income throughout 1912

" " 699,272.24

Total received up to 31 December 1911

" " 6,498,502.30

Total received

$ m/n. 7,197,774.54

Carry forward

$ m/n. 7,197,774.54

END OF PAGE 19

Brought forward

b) – Investments -

Outgoings for wages

$ 522,270.26

Outgoings by certificates

" 191,768.35

Outgoings on materials

" 205,629.52

Outgoings on carriage [by sea]

" 7,061.36

Outgings by transfer or Director General of Accountancy

" 113,635.00

Miscellaneous outgoings

" 6,039.04

Total outgoings

$ m/n. 1,047,203.53

Total outgoings to 31 December 1911

6,103,442.74

Total general outgoings

7,150,646.27

7,150,646.27

Balance to be returned

47,128,27

This balance, according to the audit at 31 December 1912, of the outstanding and Banco Nación accounts is made up thus:

In account

$ m/n. 33,635,35

Accounts in suspense corresponding to previous administrations

" " 5,367,81

In bank

" " 8,125,00

Total

$ m/n. 47,128,27

From this statement, it is evident that during the 33 months since the start of the Works till 31 December 1911, the Works has received a monthly average of $ m/n. 196,924,31, much more than the monthly average received during 1912, only amounting to $ m/n. 58,272,68.

GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS
Productive capacity of the area served

The personal observations made by the undersigned during the year just finished, as well as the experience gained with the trials of cultivation made at various locations, have served to confirm the ideas put forward in the previous Memoria with respect to the value of the surface richness of the zone of influence of this railway. As it is logical to think that the development and movement of this richness, which can only be brought about in a stable way by the land-owning settler, is being held up by the failure to sell land. This results in nomadic lease-holders or intruders, who do not concern themselves with improvements, and oblige the earth to increase its returns, thinking only about extracting the greatest benefit from their sheep folds, even when these are spread over areas disproportionate to the number of animals.
As is evident, this region is specially suited to live stock, especially sheep, which reproduce and give a good return with wool and meat, unsurpassed in quality. The security which a water table of sweet water, at depths between 4 and 30 metres, over the whole area, will be, without doubt, the greatest incentive for future settlers, and the principal factor in the production which they initiate.

The climatic conditions are benign, and according to latitude, one can grow all agricultural products, which are usual, provided that they are irrigated, and that they are sown in cañadones, [canyons], or other spots where the topography provides shelter from the wind. At the present time, there are market gardens cultivated by private initiative, whose production is capable of meeting more than local needs.

For comparison with previous years, the following table of temperature and rainfall for 1912 is given:

Month

Maximum

Minimum

Rain m/m

January

33°6

5°9

24.1

February

27°6

4°8

24.1

March

29°0

1°5

3.3

April

26°7

0°2

21.9

May

14°9

3°0

48.2

June

15°8

4°4

3.0

July

13°4

4°0

5.0

August

11°8

5°1

36.9

September

19°5

2°3

0.0

October

24°5

1°5

28.2

November

25°4

1°3

1.0

December

29°0

5°0

4.4

It is clear that the variations in temperature remain the same as those of the previous years, and that the amount of rainfall was 6 millimetres less than that in 1911; on the other hand, a quantity of snow fell, which was more than enough to make up the difference.

 

Fuel for the Undertaking

The present system burns coal

END OF PAGE 21

which is imported from Europe, and is always expensive due to the high transport costs, whether it be in the form of coal, or pressed into briquettes. It should not be used for longer than is absolutely necessary while the oil wells of Comodoro Rivadavia can be got into a state of being able to export oil.
As on the other hand, there is also the possibility that the said product will also be found here in Deseado; it would then be even more economical. It is beyond doubt that oil is the preferred fuel for this railway, and as a result it would be opportune to start making the adaptations necessary for its use, as well as the introduction of tanks, both mobile and fixed, for its transport and storage.

COMPARISON OF THE ACTUAL COST OF THE WORKS WITHIN THE ORIGINAL ESTIMATE

It is difficult to give an exact idea of the cost of the Works, as only a few of the tasks have been completed, while others are in progress, or are still to be started. To make a well-found estimate, Km. 262.000 has been taken as the temporary end of the line.
From the original project, the partial estimate corresponding to this point has been extracted, and then the actual cost to 31 October has been taken, to which is added an approximation of the costs involved to complete the work to its temporary point of conclusion. We have:

According to Estimate

1 -

Site clearance to Km. 262.000

$o/s

14676.40

$o/s

33,355.45

2 -

Earthworks to Km. 262.000

558862.10

1,270,141.13

3 -

Permanent way & ancillaries to Km. 262.000, including levelling and tapada.

2,480,388.98

5,637,247.68

4 -

Engineering works to Km. 262.000

238,207.65

541,381.02

5 -

Buildings and appurtenances

282,149.29

641,248.39

6 -

Telegraph

40,525.20

92,102.73

7 -

Provision of water

70,475.82

160,172.32

8 -

Fencing

40,685.22

92,466.37

9 -

Maintenance of the Works

92,493.00

210,211.36

10 -

Plant & workshops

44,000.00

100,000.00

Total

$o/s

3,862,463.66

$o/s

8,778,326.45

11 -

Rolling stock

947,990.00

2,154,522.72

Carry forward

4,810,453.66

10,932,849.12

END OF PAGE 22

Brought forward

4810453.66

m$n

10932849.12

Contingencies 5%

546642.46

Total

11479491.73

Management & Inspection 5%

573974.59

Total estimate to Km. 262.000

$ m/n.

12,053,466.32

ACTUAL COSTS OF CONSTRUCTION PLUS APPROXIMATE COSTS TO COMPLETE THE WORKS

To be spent, approx. - railing 9,800 km. $ 22,000.00

"

215,600.00

Second and third lifting and half tapada of 100.000 km. at $1,600,000

"

160,000.00

Total to Km. 262.000

$

5,399,414.40

"

5,399,414.40

4 -

Engineering works – Entered

$

143,876.38

Carriage and insurance

14,500.00

Staff and piece-workers

"

5,000.00

Transport

"

1,000.00

To be entered

"

2,000.00

Total

"

166,376.38

To be spent to Km. 262.000

"

5,000.00

Total

"

171,376.38

"

171,376.38

5 -

Buildings and appurtenances - Entered

"

565,652.32

Carriage and insurance

"

32,900.00

Staff and piece-workers

"

10,000.00

Transport

"

10,000.00

To be entered

"

30,000.00

Total

"

648,552.32

A 31 October the following works still to be carried out:
In Km. 0.000 station – 1 Ash trench

"

2,679.06

Carry forward

"

651,231.38

"

6,950,121.59

Total to Km. 262,000

"

231,959.45

"

231959.45

8 –

Fencing - entered

"

27,995.25

Carriage and insurance

"

6,000.00

Staff and piece-workers

"

1,000.00

Transport

"

1,000.00

To be entered

"

5,000.00

Carry forward

"

40,995.25

8090971.44

 

Brought forward

$

40,995.25

$

8,090,971.44

Lacking at Km. 224.000 station

"

3,502.92

Lacking on the line between Km. 143.293 and Km. 159.436,90

"

16,846.07

Total

"

61,344.24

"

61344.24

9 -

Maintenance of the Works -
Invested

$

49,483.25

Employees and piece-workers

"

4,000.00

Total

"

53,483.25

Needed approximately during the year as a guarantee [retention] for each zone, and without taking in to account the expenses of maintenance of the parts in which said terminal had been reached.

"

50,000.00

Total to Km. 262.000

"

103,483.25

"

103,483.25

10 -

Machine tools in Workshops – Those currently in the temporary workshops and which will be transferred to the permanent ones are:

"

Wood-working:

1 Steam engine

$

4, 545.40

1 Band-saw

"

1,393.00

1 Circular-saw

"

640.00

1 Plane

"

681.80

1 Tupí [unable to find what it means]

"

693.18

1 Chisel

"

681.80

1 Lathe – 3 metres

"

295.80

Metal-working:

1 Wheel lathe

"

7,329.45

1 Lathe – 6 metres

"

2,795.40

1 Lathe – 2,50 metres

"

2,350.00

1 Lathe – 2 metres

"

659.10

1 Self-contained welding gear

"

500.00

1 Guillotine

"

227.27

1 Screw lathe

"

800.00

1 Large drill

"

2,272.70

1 Small drill

"

250.00

1 Plane – 2.50 metres

"

3,749.96

1 Plane – 0.50 metres

"

1,056.80

1 Hand plane

"

350.00

1 Grooving machine

"

1,545.43

1 Hole punch

"

4,000.00

1 Hand hole punch

"

70.50

1 Polishing machine

"

110.00

2 Sharpeners

"

148.00

1 Channelling machine

"

90.00

1 Moulding machine

"

246.00

1 Tyre press

"

181.12

1 Wire tiling machine

"

85.00

1 Blackstone motor

"

3,181.80

1 Dynamo 36 amp.

"

409.00

1 Hydraulic pump for boilers

"

110.00

1 Hammer

"

1.490.00

1 Foundry furnace

"

1,125.00

Total staff and piece-workers

$

44,063.51

Carriage & insurance 20%

"

8,812.70

Expended

"

52,876.21

Carry forward

$

52,876.21

$

8255798.93

END OF PAGE 25

Brought forward

$

52,876.21

$

8255798.93

Required to complete the permanent workshops and provide a small workshops

"

44,265.00

Total machines

"

97,141.21

97141.21

11 -

Rolling stock -

Entered up to 31 October

"

1,089,051.45

To be entered

"

227,498.51

Carriage and insurance

"

150,000.00

Staff and piece-workers

"

10,000.00

Total

"

1,476,549.96

Deduct the value of stock which will be passed to other works to be constructed.

$

300,000.00

Stock yet to arrive:

"

1,176,549.96

8 Locomotivess

2 first class coaches

2 composite coaches

5 composite vans

80 Box vans

75 High sided wagons

32 Livestock wagons

15 Plataformas

1 Motor bicycle

"

1,034,451.00

Total

$

2,211,000.96

2211000.96

Balance on the Transport account

$

52,074.51

Balance on the Stores account = á $ m/n. 469,986,55 to be entered deducting approximately $100,000.00 for materials yet to be charged to the account, and which will be used to complete the works to Km. 262.000 (expenses already included) and $ 100,000.00 for materials to be passed to subsequent sections.

"

269,986.55

 

Balance of the Freight and Insurance account

"

48,842.65

Replanting

"

18,333.59

Provisional and Supplementary

"

58,037.39

Various

"

130,235.05

"

577509.74

Management and passages for staff up to 31 October

$

606,364.36

To be spent as far as Km. 262.000

"

150,000.00

"

756364.36

Cost of the line completed to Km. 262 original kilometrage.

$ m/n.

11897815.20

Note – This sum does not include the value of the materials in store, pertaining to employees and piece-workers, and of the rolling stock to be passed to subsequent sections to carry out the Works. They are the three following:

Outcome of employees and piece-workers

$

188,570.05

" rolling stock

"

30,0000.00

" stores

"

100,000.00

Total

$ m/n.

588,570.05

END OF PAGE 26

Comparison with the estimate

Above can be seen that the total estimate for the line to Km. 262.000 (old measure) is:

$ m/n. 12,053,466.32

And that the approximate cost will be

" " 11,897,815.20

Saving

" " 155,651.12

 

WORKS OUTWITH THE ESTIMATE

1° - Permanent workshops at Km. 0.000 station. The original estimate only allowed for a small workshop, engine shed and coach shed, whose cost has been included in the part entered against buildings, and invested in the permanent engine shed and in the part already constructed of the permanent coach shed. Outwith the estimate is the cost of the permanent workshops which will amount to approximately

$ 79,450.00

 

2° - Fencing of the secondary line between Km. 0.000 station and the Port 3.630 km. At $ 1,180.00 each =

$ 4,283.40

14 field gates – 12 cattle grids y 6 level crossings for the same

" 7,309.40

" 11,592.80

3° - Enclosure of Km. 0.000 station

" 13,620.00

4° - For bore holes in search of the second water table at Km. 0.000 station, and the provision of the water supply system will amount to approximately

$ 100,000.00

total

$ m/n. 204,662.80

Surplus on the original estimate

$ 155,651.12

Works outwith the estimate

" 204,662.80

Nett increase in cost including the works outwith the estimate

$ 49,011.68

As can be seen in the whole of this comparison the financial situation of the Works with respect to the official estimates is correct.

END OF PAGE 27

 

CONDICIONAL OPERATION

Income
The income during the twelve months of 1912 are made up thus:

January

$ 1,304.50

February

" 1,471.20

March

" 1,397.80

April

" 1,597.50

May

" 1,693.90

June

" 2,136.35

July

" 2,087.50

August

" 2,669.20

September

" 3,394.70

October

" 3,846.45

November

" 4,867.89

December

" 6,299.85

Total $ m/n.

32786.84

The passenger traffic has been the following:

Passenger Traffic for 1912

Month

1st Class

2nd Class

Total

Kilometres

January, February, March & April

421

421

42,351.0

May

1

172

173

20245.0

June

4

172

176

15435.0

July

19

214

233

21844.0

August

11

261

272

19,491.0

September

12

262

274

32,500.0

October

38

238

276

26,210.0

November

32

155

187

29,432.7

December

44

314

358

29,760.8

Totals

161

2209

2370

237,269.5

Goods Traffic for 1912

Month

Tonnes of goods carried

Kilometre-tonnes

Up*

Down

Total

January, February,March & April

1,598,000

680,100

2,278,100

214,250,000

May

72,000

40,000

112,000

10,619,000

June

531,000

531,000

9,236,500

July

85,000

2,000

87,000

10,456,000

August

91,000

91,000

14,783,000

Carry Forward

2,377,000

722,100

3,099,100

259,344,500

Carried forward

2,377,000

722,100

3,099,100

259,344,500

September

118,000

3,000

121,000

26,714,000

October

221,000

43,000

264,000

25,649,000

November

219,44

110,163

329,608

50,798,037

December

146,805

247,007

393,812

63,737,468

3,082,250

1,125,270

4,207,520

426,243,005

These goods were made up as follows
1 - Agricultural produce 768,508
2 - Industrial products 2,332,087
3 - Construction materials 720,100
4 - Fuel and merchandise 101,825
5 - Livestock on the hoof 285,000
Total 4,207,520

It may be seen looking at these tables that the receipts, and as a result the traffic is steadily increasing, which is not a result of any increase in the length of the line which has been relatively reduced, but arises from the same increase occasioned from the area it serves, and the constant efforts by this Management to facilitate the application of the tariffs, and the affluence of the passengers. To this end the movement of the trains has been regulated, fixed timetables established, and made known to the public.
The weekly number of trains has varied according to the needs of the Works, but in each case steps have been taken to ensure that they were known about in good time by the interested parties.
As is clear here that the extra expense brought about by the public services has been relatively small, being limited to the addition of a composite coach, and goods vehicles as required, to the materials train.

TARIFFS

Having also noted that the tariff established in the Reglamento de Contabilidad de las Construcciones [the financial standing orders for the Works] had unsatisfactory results

END OF PAGE 29

for the public, as it obliged even small loads to use a whole wagon, it was resolved to put in to effect the tariff sent down by the Superiority. This tariff improved conditions, and improved relations between the settlers and the railway, but their application has demonstrated the need for various reforms of which the following are the most important:
A – This line needs special defensive tariffs, due to its particular location in respect to the sea, which runs parallel to it for a long way. In this area the cost of transport to the nearest railway station, plus the railway's charges, are often more than sending the goods direct by cart to Mazaredo, or Cabo Blanco, or one of the other ports along the coast.
B – The present tariff does not take into account this special circumstance, because it was conceived for other railways. It also is unfair to the small producer, as it depends on the quantity of goods, and not on the distance conveyed. The immediate effect is that the small producer pays more than a big one. Consider two producers at Km. 200.000 station, one small, one large, sending goods to the Port. The small one sends 5 tonnes of wool, and the second 30 tonnes, both compressed and baled. According to the tariffs currently in effect, the cost for the first five tonnes is $ 0.48 x 200 / 5 = $ 19.20; while each of the 30 tonnes of the big producer costs only $ 1.20 x 200 / 30 = $ 8.00. This enormous difference of $ 11.20, weighs heavily on the poor producer. It affects the majority of the settlers, as there are few establishments whose harvests of wool are more than 20 tonnes per year.
It is probable that on preparing the tariffs for 5 to 10, and for 15 to 30 tonnes, benefiting the unitary prices as a part of their increase, they have tried to take advantage of the rolling stock by not using vehicles with part loads. Also

END OF PAGE 30

it is certain that the settler of these regions habituated, for tens of years, to fight the weather and its inclemencies, and with the great distances, inconveniences and never ending obstacles, would have accepted with better grace the increase in the transport charges, and would have waited a few days to effect transport together.
On the other hand, these differences may make a place for intermediate commission agents to combine small consignments to send them later as part of a larger one, thus gaining good prices without any benefit to the railway.
In the same way, and always using the same quantities of goods as the basis for discount, and not for distance as in the current tariff, there are anomalies such as:
A consignee of 20 or 25 tonnes needs to pay as if it were 30. Even if two consignments are made, one of 15 tonnes and one of 5, or one of 15 and one of 10, it results in both cases of more than would be paid for 30 tonnes. There remains a great gulf between the consignments of 15 tonnes and of 30 tonnes, which along with the 10 and 15 are the four loads that are the only ones figured in the tariff. This situation continues to favour the commission agents of whom we have spoken about above.
From the considerations made in paragraphs A and B, this Management considers that it is appropriate to adapt the current tariff as follows:
1 – Keep the four existing classes.
2 – Give prices per tonne of 1,000 kg, allowing divisions of 10 kg. With a minimum of 100 kg.
3 – Allow bonuses on prices with respect to the journey covered and not with respect to the quantity carried.
4 – Establish a special temporary bonus for goods from the Port to Km. 121.000 station and vice versa.
In connection with this last reform, which is more than a simple authorization for discount, it is proper to keep in mind that its necessity will disappear as soon as some of the improvements are made in the Port of Deseado to complement the facilities already owned by the railway. These improvements will result in an immediate and notable cheapening of the costs of carriage by sea with advantages for the railway,

END OF PAGE 31

for the settlers, and for the same shipping lines due to the greater speed in operations of loading and unloading. It would be necessary to bring together the larger quantities in one single place, something which doesn't happen today. This cheapening, as it would not be checked by the ports, or imitated by the competition, would make the contest impossible, and as a consequence would make the special discount disappear.

TRAFFIC

It has become clear that this Management has procured, by all means possible, the development of relations in respect of traffic with the settlers, giving all the facilities, securities and conveniences at their disposal, by means of fixed time tables, selection of staff, and the inclusion of a composite coach in the trains to which the public have access. In the same way, the same advantages have been sought for the consignees having no longer reason to complain about the tariffs above. Nevertheless, in respect of the wagons which need to be built, as stock for the permanent operation of the line, which may be excellent for one line, may be out of place for others, I think it appropriate to make the following observations:
1 – It should be taken in to account that the region served is totally livestock based, principally sheep, from which it is evident that the down goods will be made up, in the initial stages of operation, of wool, hides and sheep on the hoof.
The consequence is that for this service plataformas and two-deck livestock wagons are needed, along with loading facilities including corrals and drinking troughs, as seen in the Estado General de los trabajos. A sheep wagon has been made here and others will be made until there are four,
which with the ten, which the Superiority have been requested to provide, will bring the first stock of 14 wagons available for this traffic.
It can be foreseen that, since livestock on the hoof is going to be one of the principal constituents of the working, if not the most important, and since wool gives rise to traffic only during a relatively short period each year,

END OF PAGE 32

while the former will probably be more constant. Moreover the existence of the train, which will facilitate the concentration of livestock at Puerto Deseado, will assuredly result in the installation of a frigorífico, in which case the 14 wagons will be insufficient.
At present, work has started at those stations, determined by experience, on the construction of livestock loading facilities of a type suited to the region.
For the transport of large livestock [ie cattle] single-deck wagons will be required, but a fewer number than the former. Two of them will be built in our workshops, having asked the Superiority for the acquisition of a further four to make up the number to six.
In summary, the total number of livestock wagons of one and two decks will be twenty, six built here, and 14 which will need to be bought.
2 – During the first period of operation, the amount of up goods sent by the public will be twice that of the down, and to this needs to be added the amount of the materials needed for the construction of the railway which are all in the up direction, which thus makes it almost triple that of the down.
The up public goods traffic will be mostly made up of construction materials such as timber, galvanised [corrugated] iron, posts, wire and all the materials usual in rural establishments. Greater traffic will surely arise following the division of the properties, which the disposal of the enormous area of fiscal land, covering the zone of influence of this line, will promote forcefully.

This imbalance in loads will give rise to difficulties in the initial operation, as it will frequently be necessary to run vehicles empty to the Port.

This difficulty will only decrease when there is a nucleus of traffic staff, who are competent, and have the foresight to know-how, to make best use of the vehicles.

The Management considers that the big disparity between up and down loadings will be a nuisance only in the first period of operation. Once a large number of rural establishments have been created following the sale of the land, and the demand for construction materials will have diminished as a proportion of the whole, while

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the produce of the land, arising from the larger population, will increase, the traffic will come into equilibrium in the no distant future.

With respect to the personnel in traffic, whose competency must be excellent, this Management has been zealous in making it so, and despite having this nucleus which has been well developed on the basis of the present reduced traffic, but will shortly be lacking in numbers, which makes it opportune to think about a team ready for the increase in traffic and which may serve as staff for the future operation. Considering the experience gained during the conditional operation, and taking into account that staff in this region command higher wages than is paid to train staff in the north, without which they will not come. An estimate of the traffic staff which will be needed from now on is:

These staff would be sufficient for the service up to the projected Km. 322.500 station, given of course, that all the Station Masters are qualified as telegraphists in order to augment that staff.

The four peripatetic telegraphists would be employed in the permanent service at the Headquarters station, for assistants in the stations of greatest movement, and as locums. The 16 pointsmen, determined on the basis of one per station, and may also be used as pumpmen at the places where there is a supply of water.

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RAILWAYS OF THE FAR
RAILWAYS OF THE FAR

Glossary

Site map

Main pages

Ambitious plans

Towards Bariloche

And back to Viedma

Bariloche line locos

Bariloche line rolling stock

Bariloche line extra photos

From Com. Rivadavia

Com. Riv. line locos

Com. Rivadavia line extra photos

From Pto. Deseado

Pto. Des. line locos

Pto. Deseado line extra photos

Pto. Deseado line extra photos 2

Appendices

1 Text of law 5559

2 Chronology of Patagonian railway proposals

3 Bariloche line route itinerary

4 Com. Rivadavia route itinerary

5 Pto. Deseado route itinerary

6 Bariloche line loco list

7 Com. Rivadavia line loco list

8 Pto. Deseado line loco list

9 FCE wagon diagrams

10 Map of Com. Rivadavia

11 Pto. Deseado lines plans

12 Examples of tickets

13 FCP 1957 report 1

14 FCP 1957 report 2

15 FCP working timetable instructions 1960

16 Report on construction 1912 A

17 Report on construction 1912 B

16 Report on construction 1912 A

17 Report on construction 1912 B

18 Two reports from 1912

19 Telegram about labourers •

20 Account of a journey

21 President Alcorta address

22 Purchase of rails decree

23 Purchase of wagons decree

 

 

Chapter 4

The FCE broad gauge network

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